Sunday, November 28, 2010

Yaifo 4.8

OpenBSDI've updated Yaifo to 4.8 to go with OpenBSD 4.8.

It can be downloaded from Sourceforge.

I've tested macppc, i386, and amd64. I'm having an issue with sparc64 and have not yet tested sgi, alpha, or landisk (which I'm pretty sure doesn't build yet). sparc64 works, it just prints out an error message every few seconds. If someone wants to submit a patch, I can commit it and release a 4.8.1 or something.

Please subscribe to the mailing list and submit any test reports, diffs, suggestions.

Thanks.

Oh, and Yaifo HEAD is now sync'd with OpenBSD -current (as of 2010-11-28).

Monday, November 8, 2010

Yaifo 4.8 Beta

OpenBSDI've merged changes from OpenBSD 4.8 into Yaifo and checked it into CVS (:pserver:anoncvs@yaifo.cvs.sourceforge.net:/cvsroot/yaifo). Please test it.

I've tested macppc, i386, and amd64. I'm having an issue with sparc64 and have not yet tested sgi, alpha, or landisk (which I'm pretty sure doesn't build yet).

Please subscribe to the mailing list and submit any test reports, diffs, suggestions so I can get Yaifo 4.8 released.

Thanks.

Tuesday, June 1, 2010

Yaifo 4.7 Beta

OpenBSDIt's been a while, but I'm almost ready to release Yaifo for OpenBSD 4.7. I have tested my updates with i386, amd64, macppc, and alpha. I consider those architectures "stable". I know sgi and landisk aren't working. I don't have a sparc, so I can't test that. I have to replace a disk in my sparc64, so I'll test that when I can (I expect to have ramdisk space issues).

If you are able or are willing to test sgi, landisk, sparc, or sparc64, test reports and diffs are welcome.

The beta release can be downloaded from SourceForge.

Saturday, January 2, 2010

T-Mobile G1 + CyanogenMod = Pure Win

In April (2009), I switched to T-Mobile and got the G1. The G1 is one of the first phones running the Open Source operating system developed in part by Google called Android (using the Linux kernel). Recently, you've probably seen commercials for the new Android-based phone from Verizon: the Motorola Droid.

The G1 is great. It's about as tall as the iPhone, not as wide, but almost twice as thick. The reason for its thickness is a full hardware keyboard that slides out from underneath the screen. Most phones with large screens tend to have software keyboards: they are programs running on the screen covering up part of whatever application you're using. While I've never tried an iPhone, I had an iPod Touch (which I've since given to Holly) and tried using the SSH client on the iPhone. It was almost unusable because it covered up half the terminal window.

My old phone, a Palm Treo running PalmOS, was paid for by my previous company and so was the service. So, when I started a new job in May, I knew I needed to buy a new phone...